The right textile choice for your furniture is something that many people overlook when they’re putting together a new interior design layout.

There has to be some discrimination, as different fabrics have different properties and textures, and this influences the functional part of the design.

Choosing between fabrics is a paramount requirement if you want to achieve the comfort you’re looking for: not everyone enjoys the same stuff.

You could get the Eames Lounge chair replica in other fabrics apart from leather, but it wouldn’t really be the classic look. In any case, we love whatever you love, so we have a whole range of finishes.

Today we’re going to discuss the differences between leather and wool. The texture of leather is so particular and unique that it tends to the separated from other types of fabrics, and thus belongs to its own category.

Its counterpart (for the purposes of this article) will mostly be wool, one of the most popular living room fabrics and a favorite leather substitute in our catalog. To make this blog post much more approachable and easy to understand, we’ll just divide list the pros and cons in two parts:

Wool

Each two of these elements has their own negative and positive aspects and connotations. Wool is believed to be much more comfortable than leather, and much more flexible.

Synthetic variants are even more flexible, providing that ‘sinking’ feel you get whenever you place your whole weight into the seat of your couch, lounge chairs, etcetera.

The padding is also important, as you can’t really ‘sink’ on a dining chair upholstered in wool (or leather), but you will always feel a particular softness that you can’t get with any other fabric.

Here’s an Eames Lounge chair replica in comfortable wool. Click on the image to learn more!

Most fabrics are not as flexible as wool, and have a firm layer (of various materials) beneath the surface of the upholstery.

This makes them as hard as leather in many cases, but they’ll usually have a very soft and sometimes furry exterior, like velvet, for example. Most fabrics will indeed be a little less durable than actual leather.

Another good feature of wool, however, is that it won’t scratch as easily as a leather surface, and you are able to find it in a much wider variety of colors and patterns.

Our Wing chair in wool (also available in classic black leather) Click the photo to see more!

Leather 

One thing that many people don’t really take into consideration when it comes to leather is the fact that it can help your allergies. They tend to be easier to clean and don’t hold as much dust as other fabrics.

However, some people are allergic to leather itself, and can get rashes from direct contact. If you’re not one of those people, you might also benefit from the fact that leather is much more solid and easy to clean and maintain.

The best leather does get scratches and markings, but these fade over time and (in some types of leather) they end up becoming part of the upholstered, giving it a beautiful natural look.

The Egg chair replica (inspired by the original Arne Jacobsen piece), is also one of our best offerings in full black leather.

Now, let’s talk aesthetics. Even though our economies and factories have advanced a lot, and most people have access to both leather and other fabrics equally, leather still remains king when it comes to elegance.

There is a historical notion to see leather as a luxurious type of fabric, meant for high-end spaces, and that still remains today.

For a lot of people, leather equals money, even if it’s cheaper than other contemporary fabrics. This doesn’t mean that wool is for poor people; common fabrics are just considered homelier and familiar while leather is a marker of status.

As a final note, you should always consider what you want your house to convey in a visual sense. As we mentioned before, leather has a much more limited roster of colors and patterns, but you can still find leather upholstery in vibrant colors like blue, red, and even yellow. Choosing this type of leather might give you an aesthetic edge, but you will have to dig a little deeper to find it.