The Arco floor lamp is another staple from the mid-century array of timeless, beautiful objects that come prepackaged with history and style. It is one of those objects that become so famous that they ultimately transform into manufacturing clichés, with only a handful of them retaining their original value.

The Arco lamp is indeed a very “cliché” design, but most furniture products that become stereotypical owe their fame to the designers who made them extremely useful, flexible, gorgeous, and sophisticated. But people still get sold a lot of bad replicas every single day, so how can I keep that from happening to me? There are 5 ways to spot a bad Arco lamp replica:

1. The Arco itself

New buyers should always be on the lookout for a replica that has a square-shaped tube. This is very important, since people tend to think that the arching form of the lamp corresponds with a curved design all over.

2. The marble on the base

If you’re buying an Arco lamp that does not feature real Carrara marble, you will most likely encounter issues in the future. The original design of the base weighs over 150 pounds and requires two people to carry it.

Surely you will find replicas that don’t weigh as much and can keep the lamp straight, but those lamps can easily topple over and make you lose your money.

3. The shade

Originally, the shade is adjustable on a good Arco lamp replica. The Castiglioni brothers, who created the lamp in the sixties, intended for it to be sort of a house streetlamp that could light an entire room and be adjusted accordingly. If you can’t adjust the shade on your Arco lamp replica, you’ve been duped.

4. The size

The lamp is a huge object, and it should be. If you read the paragraph directly above, you’ll know why this is important. If your Arco lamp reproduction is lighting the hallway, or a corner of your bedroom, then it’s probably not the best replica in the market.

5. The price

This is the deal maker. Keep in mind that a quality Arco floor lamp replica with all of the features described above will set you back $500 at most. Anything north of that and you should consider doing some digging first.